Browse Categories

Autism, Play and Social Interaction Lone Gammeltoft and Marianne Sollok Nordenhof Translated by Erik van Acker

<< Previous in For Family Next in For Family >>

Price: $20.95

Autism, Play and Social Interaction is a fully illustrated guide that explains how to help children with autism spectrum disorders engage in interactive play, which is vital for the acquisition of social skills and attention to shared activities.

The authors explain how to set up suitably structured play environments, games schedules and play routines, and how to use visual aids and other props to facilitate co-operative play and interaction. Common children's games have been adapted to accommodate children with autism spectrum disorders and range from simple interaction, such as 'putting-in' and 'give and take', to more complex games like 'hide and seek', 'sound-lotto' and 'spin the bottle', as well as games that teach social behaviour, such as exchanging toys and engaging with other children for play opportunities.

This is a practical and accessible book for parents and teachers of children with autism spectrum disorders, as well as professionals working with these children.

'Overall, this practical book is a real asset to the limited literature on how to develop play in children with autism. It should be essential reading for parents and practitioners who work with young and able children with autism. It is very motivating and thought provoking as it inspires the reader to try out the described activities and further develop them.'

- GAP (Good Autism Practice)

'This book will be useful for early years and primary-aged children with autism, and will be a much needed resource for Early Years Educators and Teachers. I highly recommend this enjoyable, easy-to-follow book of instructions. It clearly shows us ways of reaching the world of a child with autism and how to bridge the 'social gap' by playing to the strengths of children with autism fully employing theirt preference for visual clues and routines.'

- Debate

'The book is primarily practical, but provides some insights into why children with autism struggle with play, how working on play skills can help develop social skills and how games can be adapted to make them meaningful to children with autism.'

- Speech & Language Therapy in Practice

'This illustrated guide for parents and teachers aims to help children with autism spectrum disorders and engage in interactive play, vital for the acquisition of social skills and attention to shared activities. It explains how to set up suitably structured play environments and play routines and offers versions of common children's games adapted to accommodate children with autism spectrum disorders as well as games that teach social behaviour.'

- Human Givens

'A guide to helping children with asd engage in interactive play as a means to gaining social skills and developing attention to shared activities.'

- BILD - Current Awareness Newsletter

'The games are simple to prepare and play; many require only a balloon or two or some colored pieces of paper. However, consultants and teachers Gammeltoft and Nordenhof have found that carefully adapting games and ensuring that locations of play feel safe to children with autism can result in significant progress. They take an educational approach to playing, noting that the goal of such play for children with autism is to increase social interaction and create shared playing and working experiences. They emphasize the visual as they show how to organize games so children know the limits of pay and receive individual systems of support. They describe how to set up and play 19 games ranging from the very simple (such as give-and-take) to the complex (such as spin the bottle) and those with social rules such as exchanging toys.'

- Book news

Preface. 1.Introduction. 2.Educational Approach to Playing. 3.Organizing Games. 4.Examples of Games. 5.Epilogue. Bibliography. Index.

Product Reviews

Rate This Product:
or Create a Review
(0 Ratings, 0 Reviews)
Search
Shopping Cart
Your cart is empty.